Monthly Archives: April 2013

Home Instead Senior Care Wins 2013 Ultimate Canadian Franchise Award of Excellence

Home Instead Senior Care Wins 2013 Ultimate Canadian Franchise Award of Excellence

(Toronto, ON) April 12, 2013 – Home Instead Senior Care, the world’s trusted provider of companionship, Alzheimer’s and home care for seniors, has been awarded the highest prize of excellence by the Canadian Franchise Association (CFA).

The leading provider of non-medical in-home care services for seniors has established itself across the country with its mission to enable Canadian seniors to live happy, healthy, and independent lives in their homes.

This success has now been nationally recognized as Home Instead Senior Care was the Grand Prize winner of the 2013 CFA Awards of Excellence in Franchising and Gold Winner in the Category of Non-Traditional Franchise Systems – Mature/Established, presented by the Canadian franchise Association. “We are very honoured that as an organization we have been recognized with this outstanding award,” said Jeff Huber, President of Home Instead, Inc., the franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network. “Our franchisees and their CAREGivers provide an extraordinary level of care to Canadian seniors and they bring passion and commitment to changing the face of ageing across Canada.” “Some see challenges serving Canada’s ageing population, but Home Instead Senior Care is an organization that truly sees great promise,” he added.

Home Instead Senior Care is growing rapidly across Canada, with 32 locally – owned franchises, employing thousands of caregivers. Franchise opportunities across the country are available as well as a master franchise partnership in Quebec. For more information about in-home care services, please visit http://www.homeinstead.com.

Home Instead Senior Care franchisees provide outstanding care for Canadians living with Alzheimer’s disease.Currently, 500,000 Canadians have Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia and within a generation that number is expected to more than double.

Canadian franchisees provide free Alzheimer’s family caregiver training workshops and extensive resources. For more information please visit:

http://www.helpforalzheimersfamilies.ca/.

About the CFA Awards Open exclusively to CFA Franchise System members who have been franchising for three years or more, the CFA Awards of Excellence in Franchising recognize excellence in franchise operations.

Winning systems must demonstrate a dedication to superior franchisee relations, leadership, business planning, marketing, training and support, ongoing operations and communications. The Award was presented April 8, 2013 during a gala awards presentation dinner at the 22nd annual CFA National Convention in Montréal, Quebec.

Home Care Hamilton helping older adults and elderly live independently and safely at home.
Please call 905-521-5500.

Call for a free personalized Care Consultation 905-521-5500

Pneumonia Help for Canadian Seniors

Pneumonia Help for Canadian Seniors

After two long weeks in the hospital, Grandma Lizzie’s big day was near – she was eagerly anticipating her dismissal from the hospital.  Pneumonia, which sometimes is difficult to diagnose in seniors because they don’t always exhibit the classic symptoms, had sapped her energy and left her confused. Now bright-eyed and smiling, she couldn’t wait to get home.

If your loved is returning home from the hospital and needs help recovering from Pneumonia, here’s how a Home Instead CAREGiver can be of assistance:


Nutrition Management:
 Since diet plays a big role in recovery, a Home Instead CAREGiver can help with grocery shopping and meal preparation. Preparing healthy meals for a client offers opportunities to interact as well as a chance to observe and record the client’s food intake.

Medication Reminders: A Home Instead CAREGiver can pick up prescriptions and refills, and oversee medication reminders to help reduce the risk of a medication mishap. A Home Instead CAREGiver can also make a note of any reactions or side effects so they can be addressed during a doctor’s appointment or, if needed, alert the doctor immediately.

Exercise and Activity: Senior loved ones often are urged to maintain a daily regime of simple at-home activity or walking. A Home Instead CAREGiver can remind and encourage a client to stay on schedule with exercising.

Assistance with Daily Routine:
 Pneumonia may make an older adult very weak. Light housekeeping and assistance with bathing, dressing and toileting are other services that may be available.

Excessive Emotional Stress or Depression: It’s not uncommon for a senior loved one to become anxious or depressed after returning from the hospital. A Home Instead CAREGiver’s companionship can help, and a Home Instead CAREGiver can alert family members or the client’s doctor if signs of depression appear.

Keeping Records: Many senior loved ones will be required to record their weight in a diary every morning. A Home Instead CAREGiver can be instrumental in helping a senior track important measurables.

Doctor Appointments: Follow-up visits to doctors are often required to ensure that an older adult’s lungs are rebounding. A Home Instead CAREGiver can track scheduled appointments, prepare a client for the trip and provide transportation.

For more information contact your local Hamilton Home Instead Senior Care office at 905-521-5500 or visit ReturningHome.com.

Home Care Hamilton helping older adults and elderly live independently and safely at home.
Please call 905-521-5500.

Call for a free personalized Care Consultation 905-521-5500

Gain Knowledge about Parkinson’s Disease

Gain Knowledge about Parkinson’s Disease

April is Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month.

Being a caregiver to anyone with a serious illness like Parkinson’s Disease is a life- changing experience. If dementia is a factor, that’s an added challenge. As much as possible, try to establish and stick to routines, break tasks down in to small steps, explain everything carefully and don’t rush, do one thing at a time, and redirect conversation to related, more positive topics when things go off track.

Here’s a story of a client who is struggling to help her husband with Parkinson’s disease:

Question: How do I handle my husband who has Parkinson’s? What do I say when he accuses me of not going to the gym in the morning? I had to stop my membership and am now going to a gym where he can do exercise as well. He fell a few times and stopped going.

Dr. Amy: I wonder if your husband might be suffering from dementia. It’s not uncommon in people with Parkinson’s Disease. Symptoms can include confusion, memory loss, slowed thinking and disorientation. This can make daily life more challenging, as your husband’s brain doesn’t work the way it used to. At the same time, it’s not uncommon for people with Parkinson’s to suffer from depression, which often presents as dementia. It’s important to talk to your husband’s doctor about the symptoms and make sure this gets addressed.

Research shows that Parkinson’s patients who exercise regularly do better than those who don’t.  When you see the doctor, ask about a regular  exercise plan. For your husband, exercise will help with balance, mobility, and his ability to take care of everyday activities. For both of you it’s a good way to release stress and promote a sense of well being. Here is some information on this topic, in case you have not seen it: http://www.parkinson.org/Parkinson-s-Disease/Treatment/Exercise/Neuroprotective-Benefits-of-Exercise

Home Care Hamilton helping older adults and elderly live independently and safely at home.
Please call 905-521-5500.

Call for a free personalized Care Consultation 905-521-5500

Five Wishes – Express How You Want to be Treated

Five Wishes – Express How You Want to be Treated

The Five Wishes document helps you express how you want to be treated if you are seriously ill and unable to speak for yourself. It is unique among all other living will and health agent forms because it looks to all of a person’s needs: medical, personal, emotional and spiritual. Five Wishes also encourages discussing your wishes with your family and physician.

Five Wishes lets your family and doctors know:

  • Who you want to make healthcare decisions for you when you can’t make them for yourself.
  • The kind of medical treatment you want or don’t want.
  • How comfortable you want to be.
  • How you want people to treat you.
  • What you want your loved ones to know.

Five Wishes was created by the national non-profit organization Aging with Dignity, and originally distributed with support from a grant by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and healthcare. Over 11 million copies of Five Wishes have been distributed worldwide through a network of more than 15,000 organizations. With support from the United Health Foundation, Aging with Dignity recently introduced Five Wishes translated into 20 new languages.

For more information, or to obtain copies of the 11-page Five Wishes booklet and other resources, contact Aging with Dignity at 888-5 WISHES (594-7437) or online at www.agingwithdignity.org. Individual copies are $5, bulk orders of 25 or more are only $1 per copy.

For more tips about talking with your seniors about a variety of subjects call 905-521-5500.

Call for a free personalized Care Consultation 905-521-5500

Home Care Hamilton helping older adults and elderly live independently and safely at home.
Please call 905-521-5500.

Behaviors Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementias

Behaviors Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementias

Behaviors Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease or Other Dementias Changing Aging Through Research and Education

Outlined below are behaviors that may become evident with the progression of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias. The following chart may be helpful to indicate the prevalence of these behaviors.

Delusions

  • Doesn’t recognize familiar surroundings or faces
  • Hearing/seeing/believing things that are not real
  • Demonstrates impaired perception of reality
  • Acts fearful without good reason
  • Wandering
  • Trying to leave home to look for something
  • Wanting to go outside without proper clothing
  • Loses way in familiar surroundings

Refusal

  • Refusing to do personal care activities (bathing, dressing, eating etc.)
  • Refusing to get out of bed
  • Refusing to take medications
  • Refusing or unwilling to attend social activities

Aggression

  • Easily frustrated
  • Physical altercations (push or strike out)
  • Yelling and/or swearing
  • Repetition
  • Repeating questions and/or words
  • Repeating stories
  • Repeating activities

Agitation

  • Restless
  • Pacing around the house

Sexual Inappropriateness

  • Inappropriate with self
  • Inappropriate with others

False Accusations

  • Becomes suspicious
  • Reaches illogical conclusions
  • Missing items are “stolen”

Local Home Instead Senior Care in Mississauga ON offers specialized training on Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias for their CAREGivers and for families –  please call 905-521-5500.

You will receive the following Alzheimer’s & Dementia caregiving information:

  • Access & Event Information for Free Monthly Online Live Chats with Experts
  • Receive Online Transcripts from Each Live Chat Event
  • Get Information from our Online E-learning Course for Caregivers
  • Latest News and Resources from the Alzheimer’s & Dementia Community
  • Receive Support from Over 200,000 in Our Facebook Community “Remember for Alzheimer’s”

Access your free copy of the Alzheimer’s Senior Emergency Kit using this link.

Home Care Hamilton helping older adults and elderly live independently and safely at home.
Please call 905-521-5500.

Call for a free personalized Care Consultation 905-521-5500

When Hospice Isn’t Enough

When Hospice Isn’t Enough

We want to help your loved one live life to its fullest, which includes helping to manage certain conditions to help avoid debilitating complications.

The following ABCs are important measurements for diabetes management, as well as pre-diabetes and heart disease. These three measurements will help your loved one’s doctor make helpful diet and lifestyle recommendations, and our CAREGivers will work with you and your loved one to help ensure those recommendations are met.

A is for the A1C test, an estimate of blood sugar levels over the past three months. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) generally recommends that people with diabetes aim for an A1C level of less than 7 percent.

A1C test results help doctors make recommendations such as diet changes to help manage the diabetes. We put together this Nutrition for Seniors workbook (PDF 411 KB) for practical tips and food lists to help your senior loved one eat right.

B is for blood pressure, which ideally should measure 130/80 mmHg or less, the ADA advises. According to a study published in the February 2013 issue of Diabetes Care that measured how well these ABCs were met, only half of the people with diabetes involved in the study were being treated for their blood pressure. That means half were not being treated.

Be sure to talk to your loved one’s doctor about blood pressure treatments and let our CAREGivers help you take a proactive approach to controlling your loved one’s blood pressure.

C is for cholesterol, specifically LDL (bad) cholesterol. The ADA advises LDL levels should be below 100 mg/dL. According to the study published in Diabetes Care, only half of the study participants with diabetes were on statins to lower cholesterol-a percentage that should be much larger according to some doctors.

Talk to your doctor about your loved one’s cholesterol levels and the best treatments for his or her unique situation. The FDA recently issued new safety cautions for statin use, so be sure to discuss that with a doctor as well.

Home Care Hamilton helping older adults and elderly live independently and safely at home.
Please call 905-521-5500.

Call for a free personalized Care Consultation 905-521-5500

Social Isolation Increases Risks in Older People

Social Isolation Increases Risks in Older People

Social isolation is associated with a higher risk of death in older people regardless of whether they consider themselves lonely, research suggests.

Based on a study at University College London of 6,500 UK men and women aged over 52 found that being isolated from family and friends was linked with a 26% higher death risk over seven years. “Social isolation is associated with a higher risk of death in older people regardless of whether they consider themselves lonely.”

The Age U.K. organization suggested:

  • Cuts to services for older people are compounding the problem—which will only become more severe over time.
  • Increase of 55-to-64-year-olds living alone has increased by 50 percent.
  • “Emotional support and warmth”  is needed.
  • Provide things like advice, making sure people take their medication and support in helping them to do things.

The study suggests that these practical aspects are quite important for older people’s survival.

Study leader Prof Andrew Steptoe, Director of the Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care at University College London, said: “Social connections can provide emotional support and warmth which is important but they also provide things like advice, making sure people take their medication and provide support in helping them to do things.

“It would suggest that those practical aspects are quite important for older people’s survival.

“There’s been such an increase in people living alone. In the last 15 years, the number of 55 to 64-year-olds living alone has increased by 50%.

“And it might be that people in those circumstances aren’t looking after themselves so well.”

Michelle Mitchell, director general at Age UK, said: “This study shows more clearly than before that being lonely and isolated is not only miserable, it is a real health risk, increasing the risk of early death.”

She added that cuts to local authority budget cuts may exacerbate the problem of isolation for many older people.

“Across the country day care centres, often the only regular social life that many older people enjoy, are closing, social care support which can enable older people to leave the house is being cut down to the bare minimum, and too many older people are hidden behind closed doors struggling to cope.”

Read the full story: BBC.CO.UK/News

Home Instead Senior Care in Mississauga provides in home care and companionship for seniors living alone. If you find your loved one in the throes on loneliness and isolation, we can help. Call now for your free in-home care consultation:  905-521-5500

Home Care Hamilton helping older adults and elderly live independently and safely at home.
Please call 905-521-5500.

Call for a free personalized Care Consultation 905-521-5500

Personal Care Services in Mississauga

Personal Care Services in Mississauga

Need Help Temporarily? We Have the Answer.

Our short-term recovery services are an outstanding solution that allows seniors to recover at home following surgery, an illness or an accident. Home Instead Senior Care’s services can mean a shorter stay in a rehabilitation facility, and it’s proven that people rebound more quickly in the comfort of their own home.

Non-Medical Care and Home Helper Services

Sometimes a little extra help can make a difference in how soon patients can return home, and Home Instead Senior Care is ready to assist with companionship and home helper services. Our non-medical services include things like grocery shopping, meal preparation, running errands, caring for a pet, getting your loved one to medical appointments, and even assistance with household tasks like dusting, making beds and doing laundry. And some Home Instead Senior Care offices provide personal services such as:

Medication reminders

Dressing

Bathing

Grooming

Eating

For personal home care in the Hamilton ON area, please check with your local office by calling 905-521-5500.

Home Care Hamilton helping older adults and elderly live independently and safely at home.
Please call 905-521-5500.

Call for a free personalized Care Consultation 905-521-5500